I Completed My First Coding (Bootcamp) Project!

The training wheels have been removed…

Building my first project for my coding bootcamp was quite the experience. The challenge was to build a CLI gem and use Ruby to scrape data from a website. I decided to scrape https://www.codenewbie.org/podcast. The Codenewbie Podcast is my go-to resource to learn about different topics and different roles in the tech industry. It’s also my #1 resource for coding inspiration when I feel like giving up. Often times guests on the show are career changers and self taught developers I can relate to.

My program lists all of Codenewbie’s podcast episodes with each episode’s relevant information such as the episode’s title, guest, and air date. Additionally, a user can interact with my program through their terminal and retrieve the url link for any episode in order to listen to the interview.

The due date of the project coincided with the holidays, so I had a lot of friends and family checking in and asking me how school was. I repeatedly went back to my bicycle analogy.

I am swerving heavily and am wobbly yet defiant as I ride my two wheeler.

The training wheels which were removed:

  • Using learn.co as an editor. Learn.co is Flatiron’s built in house code editor and is extremely helpful. The platform runs tests and submits pull requests to GitHub using human friendly commands such as learn and learn submit, respectively. However, I used this project as an opportunity to work with building a program locally in order to replicate a more authentic developer experience. I successfully installed Atom and connected my local files to Github using the command line. Getting comfortable with the command line was not easy, as I was following Youtube tutorials and was memorizing what to do. I had to repeat the process several times to truly understand what was happening.
  • RubyGem setup. Prior to starting my project, I never had to set up a RubyGem. Our labs already had a neatly organized library to work off of. Also, we didn’t have a lab to practice how to fill out the relevant info needed to create a gem, but I followed this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrAOlk6qoiM which proved to be very helpful! However, like I previously mentioned, the issue with recorded videos is that I tend to go through the motions- copying the instructor without truly understanding what’s going on. I had to watch the video 3 times before I felt like it seeped in.
  • Labs. Before this project, I had a neat container to learn in. Most labs are heavily focused on just a few topics with clearly written tests. However, when I went to plan out my project, I felt overwhelmed thinking about all of the concepts my project had to include. I knew I needed a different strategy. I followed along with Avi’s method on how to build a CLI Gem https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lDExWIhYKI, and I really liked his method of tackling a project. Avi stresses the importance of only focusing on the task at hand (1 or 2 objectives), completing the task, and then the next step will reveal itself. It was a playful approach to a lofty project, and I was able to make steady progress. It was fun to react to the quick decisions I was making.

I have alluded to this, but the toughest part about this project was everything besides the coding. The coding was a process I was familiar with. Strategy and setup are new and less straightforward topics for me. I was able to talk over my struggles with RubyGem setup with my Cohort Lead in our 1:1, and the strategy to tackle the project with my classmates. Although this was a solo project, having help and support from my cohort made me feel like I wasn’t in this alone. Overall I’m proud of the work I did and am excited that this is just the beginning!

P.S. Here’s a walkthrough of the app!

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